Plan for Future Construction

What will the campus look like in the distant future: Buildings, green spaces, traffic and parking

Plan for Future Construction
Lorry I. Lokey Graduate Center at the TAU Faculty of Management

This plan reflects the outline of an urban design that is hypothetical but possible (from a statutory perspective as well), of how the campus could look in the distant future according to considerations of land cover, density, building distribution, and traffic and parking arrangements.

 

According to the plan, the area in the center of the campus surrounding a central square will remain, more or less, as it is presently (except for the planned Lorry Lokey Graduate Center) and the intention is not to damage the nature of the campus with its beautiful buildings, landscaped areas and paved plazas between buildings.

 

Most of the large parking lots inside the campus will be removed and will be used as land reserves for construction, although here and there some medium-sized parking lots will remain, mainly for handicapped parking and loading and unloading zones.

 

Above the Miriam and Adolofo Smolarz Auditorium parking lot, the plan proposes erecting three tall buildings as a possible example for construction on top of future underground parking lots.

 

In the area of the gardens - the Meier Segals Garden for Zoological Research and the Botanical Garden - the plan recommends stopping at the existing building density, except for the second stage - the laboratories stage - of the Porter School for Environmental Studies which is supposed to be mainly sunken within a slope that faces the Ayalon Highway.

 

 

Expanding construction while safeguarding what already exists

The plan for future construction illustrates the possibility (one of many) of how to add significant building volume to the campus (the addition of about 50% above existing construction) without jeopardizing the nature of existing construction. We can plan the placement of future buildings such that they create urban spaces that are suited to conducting various activities while "paying respect" to the existing buildings and the spaces between them.

 

Even if there is no choice but to reduce the green spaces somewhat, the plan preserves their contiguity and, naturally, the relationship between built up and open spaces as required in the Urban Building Plan (UBP).

 

There are two areas of relatively large building concentration in the future - in the north and the south, but the most significant change reflected in the plan is along Chaim Levanon Street. Instead of a fence that goes almost along the entire length of the western side of the campus, the plan propose construction that continues the concept of Sally and Lester Entin Square - north and south, while creating street frontage that is friendly to the city and removing the fence. Construction along Levanon Street can be given an urban emphasis by using relatively tall buildings (8 to 10 storeys) in order to utilize the interface between the campus and the city - both in terms of the content and function of the buildings and so that it will be possible to keep the volume of future buildings inside the campus similar to the volume of the existing buildings, thereby preserving the nature and atmosphere of the campus. In other words: Smart planning will enable crowding in certain areas in order to keep larger "green lungs" in other areas.

 

In the southern part of the campus the plan proposes expanding the area of the "Broshim" dorms and adding three dormitory buildings. In this area we propose adding an entrance gate into the campus adjacent to the traffic circle, for those coming from the direction of the Israel Railways train station. The positioning and design of the two buildings slated to be erected here in the future should have a significant impact on the entrance gate design.

 

Looking at the overall plan for future construction, it appears that it succeeds in preserving the existing urban fabric and the human scale in most areas, even those where the plan proposes a significant increase in construction densities.

 

 

Buildings in planning and construction between the years 2010-2017

The Porter Building

Designed by: Axelrod-Grobman, Joseph Cory (Geotectura Studio) and Architects Nili and Nir Chen

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Student City Complex

Designed by : D. Kaizer - M. Kaizer - I Lekner Architects

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The Raya and Josef Jaglom Auditorium

Designed by: Yuval Cadmon Architects

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The Steinhardt Museum of Natural History, Israel; National Center for Biodiversity Studies

Designed by: Kimmel Eshkolot Architects

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The Pouran and Izak Parviz Nazarian Building

The Citizen’s Empowerment Center in Israel (CECI

The Yehiel Ben-Zvi Visitors Pavilion

Designed by: Yuval Cadmon Architects

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The Lorry I. Lokey Graduate Center

Designed by: Gottesman - Szmelcman Architecture

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Check Point Building

Designed by: Kimmel Eshkolot Architects

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Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

Designed by: Michel Ramon & Associes, France

Accompanying by: Y. Y. Granot Architects, Israel

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Engineering Research Building

Designe by: Zarhy Architects + StudioPEZ

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National Center for Post Trauma and Resilience

Designed by: Erez Shani Architectur

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Sylvan Adams Sports Institute

Fleischman Faculty of Engineering and Sackler Faculty of Engineering

Designed by: Kolker - Kolker - Epstein Architects

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Smolarz Family Building

George S. Wise Faculty of Life Science

Designed by: Kolker - Kolker - Epstein Architects

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Azrieli Architecture Building

Designed by: L2 Tsionov Vitkon Architects

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